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  1. #32
    Senior Member MKE's Avatar
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    So are you smoking the huge trout with cannabis on top and a CBD brine?

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  3. #31
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Spinner View Post
    Cannibis?
    Cannabis, you betcha!!!

  4. #30
    SET THE HOOK!!!!!!!
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrotherWilliams View Post
    Next summer will be my first time period when I will have enough income (SS and pension) to stay out and I intend to spend half the summer in the Eastern Sierra, stalking trout in the Owens, Convict lake, Lundy lake, Gull lake, Topaz lake, you get the idea. Probably head out for three weeks in July, when the water is still REALLY cold up there. Most places, I'll float tube (I'm looking for very small, but productive lakes I don't have to hike to, my hiking days are behind me, bad feet) all the small places and possible rent a boat for some place like Crowley or June lake.
    Try upper Twin!! Big browns can be had. Kinda early but their still around

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  6. #29
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrotherWilliams View Post
    I haven't been there since I had to stop flying. Is the Lakeview Inn in any kind of operation? Old man Passanini greeted us the very first time I flew up there, in 1991. Bought us coffee and breakfast just because.

    George at the old General Store taught us how to fish the lake. Details in an earlier post in this thread.

    We caught our limit in about 90 minutes, and when I was sure we had them all iced down, we waved goodbye and cruised back up to the Spaulding marina, which was out of the water for years during the drought and is only partially back in the water.

    You can get updated info at the Eagle Lake Fishing website. Crappy site with good info. We ought to get together up there and share lies. I gotz a million of 'em. :D :D :D

    A little OOPS at the Spaulding ramp!!!
    Cannibis?

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  8. #28
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by fishwrong2 View Post
    Well may be a bit late to the party on this one, but its a personal preference in my opinion. Larger fish tend to have a higher fat content. That fat tends to have a strong fish flavor to it. Folks talk about spring run kings as a delicacy because they have a higher oil and fat content to sustain them through a summer in the river. Kings and Sockeye are prized commercials because the have the same thing vs silvers and pinks. Tuna are graded based on fat and oil content with the more the better.

    We got a couple double digit fish from Pyramid lat year and they had a greasy quality to them. I personally prefer milder fish, so its not as good to me as leaner fish. For bigger Stripers and Sturgeon its imperative to clean off the lateral line and yellowish fat, or they are very fishy.

    Different strokes for different folks. Im sure the guy who got that Brown enjoyed every bit of it. Just my2 cents.
    Those cuts at the mid, DO NOT eat well, unless they are in the slot! The big boys are mushy, and best released. Every where else I've fished, big is good!

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  10. #27
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hookem2004 View Post
    Eagle Lake trout is the best in my book. I'll be headed there in October for a week of fishing between Eagle and Almanor. The only trout we don't keep are the browns. Although we get some 7-8lb browns every trip, we toss them back.

    I just keep my fish in a ice chest and process them when I'm back at the lodge and into the freezer. Never had a bad tasting trout from those lakes.
    I haven't been there since I had to stop flying. Is the Lakeview Inn in any kind of operation? Old man Passanini greeted us the very first time I flew up there, in 1991. Bought us coffee and breakfast just because.

    George at the old General Store taught us how to fish the lake. Details in an earlier post in this thread.

    We caught our limit in about 90 minutes, and when I was sure we had them all iced down, we waved goodbye and cruised back up to the Spaulding marina, which was out of the water for years during the drought and is only partially back in the water.

    You can get updated info at the Eagle Lake Fishing website. Crappy site with good info. We ought to get together up there and share lies. I gotz a million of 'em. :D :D :D

    A little OOPS at the Spaulding ramp!!!
    Last edited by BrotherWilliams; 09-19-2019 at 08:06 AM.

  11. #26
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetspray View Post
    Ha kind of gives you away......Dave
    Eh???

  12. #25
    Senior Member Waterdog's Avatar
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Ed View Post
    I have yet to have a bad tasting "Wild trout" that came out of cold waters.

    To me, water temp has a lot to do with how well the fish will taste. When the water starts to get
    higher than 78* ........... they seem to start getting soft, same goes for the spawning time of the year.

    Kokanee going into the spawn, start to go down hill with meat firmness and flavor. At this time
    I will look for different fare.

    As mentioned, water source does help out in any type of fish as well as its diet.
    Smoking can make a so, so fish bearable, or even Great!!
    I agree, all the trout Ive eaten from icy cold rivers and streams have been superb. Of course that might be because they are cooked in the beautiful outdoors by the river in frying pan or grill. Everything cooked in the wilderness seems better.
    Hunting, Fishing and Labrador Retrievers and at the end of the day a glass of Buffalo Trace Whiskey- Life is Sweet.

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  14. #24
    Senior Member Hookem2004's Avatar
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Eagle Lake trout is the best in my book. I'll be headed there in October for a week of fishing between Eagle and Almanor. The only trout we don't keep are the browns. Although we get some 7-8lb browns every trip, we toss them back.

    I just keep my fish in a ice chest and process them when I'm back at the lodge and into the freezer. Never had a bad tasting trout from those lakes.
    2018 Duckworth 235 Pacific Navigator
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  16. #23
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    Re: Are huge trout good to eat?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrotherWilliams View Post
    Oh, I've fished Eagle many times. I like the "bleed 'em and ice 'em idea and next time I'm there, that's what I'll do.

    In fact, George at the General Store (since closed and George has passed away) gave me a great technique for that lake, I'v e limited out using this technique.

    Snelled #8 hook (#6 will do but #8 is better). Put a nice fat night crawler as far as you can get it on the hook but do not PASS the bait past the end of the hook. Put some fish stinko on your bait and flip it over into the water, but no extra weight; weight of the worm is all you need.

    Leave the bail on the reel open (UL tackle) and when line starts zinging off the reel, just close it gently and fish ON! Play them in, give them the Clemenza treatment (leave the gun, take the cannoli).

    I use a BB gun to dispatch keepers and in Eagle, right now, because the lake still hasn't filled up (natural lake, small tributaries), so it's essentially a put-and-take lake right now. The alkaline lake is too alkaline and the dissolved O2 is weak because when the north half of the lake was empty, ranchers were allowed to graze their cattle on the lakebed, and besides grazing, they crapped a lot. Huge algae blooms in the north end of the lake.

    The most common species in the lake is tui chub. I compost what I catch (eww, tui chub? no way) but few keep them. I always fish near Eagles Nest (everyone does in the summer) except one time earlier in the spring, when we caught two in the shallows (this was before bovine excrement in the north end) right by the airport. We flew in (used to fly, C172A) camped in the median between the ramp and the runway, rented a boat unless we were fishing in the north end, before the drought).

    But that day we limited out, all the other people fishing were looking at us and as you know, sound carries at Eagle and we could hear them saying, "how the F-k are they doing that?" I just chuckled and basked in limiting out.

    But, yeah, I have a LOT of experience at Eagle. We ought to swap lies, comrade! :D
    Ha kind of gives you away......Dave
    2003 Alumaweld, 19'6", Chevy vortec V-6, SD-309 american turbine jet, T-8 Yamaha kicker, waiting for the tackle fairy to show up to fill my boxes

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